87

Maritime

The Mid-Atlantic ports are some of the busiest in the nation’s seaport network, which unloads $3.8 billion in goods each day.

Collision Regulation Lines

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Notes:

Aids to Navigation

Structures intended to assist a navigator to determine position or safe course, or to warn of dangers or obstructions to navigation. This dataset includes lights, signals, buoys, day beacons, and other aids to navigation.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

These data are intended for coastal and ocean use planning. Not for navigation. The aids to navigation database is maintained by the US Coast Guard and is the basis from which MarineCadastre.gov created a geospatial database for display.

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Routing Measures

Various shipping zones delineating the activities of and regulations for marine vessel traffic. Traffic lanes define specific traffic flow, while traffic separation zones assist opposing streams of marine traffic. Precautionary areas represent areas where ships must navigate with caution, and shipping safety fairways designate where artificial structures are prohibited.

Source: NOAA Office of Coast Survey

Notes:

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Shipwreck Density

Density map of reported shipwrecks illustrating the prevalence of potential historic period archaeological sites on the Atlantic OCS. These areas may be used in recreational pursuits for scuba diving, fishing, archaeology, historical study, and recovery of materials. Because this information was compiled using sources that have unreliable location information, this dataset does not represent a complete record of potential archaeological sites within a particular geographic area and is not intended for decision-making or planning purposes.

Source: BOEM

Notes:

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Port Facilities (Areas)

These areas primarily include tax parcels that overlap port facility points extracted from a database maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers Navigation Data Center. Public terminal boundaries in Virginia and Baltimore were received directly from those respective port authorities. All areas in the vicinity of Philadelphia were incorporated directly from Philly Freight Finder. Information on ownership and commodities is also included.

Source: US Army Corps of Engineers, The Nature Conservancy, Rutgers University

Notes:

Port Commodity / Port Facilities (Areas)

See Port Facilities (Areas) description.

Source: US Army Corps of Engineers, The Nature Conservancy, Rutgers University

Notes:

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Port Ownership / Port Facilities (Areas)

See Port Facilities (Areas) description.

Source: US Army Corps of Engineers, The Nature Conservancy, Rutgers University

Notes:

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NASCA Submarine Cables QA service

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N. Atlantic Right Whale SMAs

These data represent Seasonal Management Area locations where regulations implement speed restrictions in shipping areas at certain times of the year along the coast of the U.S. Atlantic seaboard. The purpose of the regulations is to reduce the likelihood of deaths and serious injuries to endangered North Atlantic right whales that result from collisions with ships as designated by 73 FR 60173, October 10, 2008, Rules and Regulations.

Source: NOAA Fisheries

Notes:

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Offshore Discharge Flow

Locations and flow attribute of discharge of effluent from waste water treatment plants receiving waste water from households, commercial establishments, and industries in the coastal drainage basin. Only offshore locations are included; inland source facilities were excluded. EPA flow data marked by facility are attributed to the federal and state offshore point data.

Source: EPA

Notes:

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Port Facilities (Points)

This is a subset of the Port Facility database maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers Navigation Data Center. This database contains all facility types that may be reported as the origin or destination of commercial waterborne vessel moves. Only those facilities relevant to the four major Mid-Atlantic ports of Virginia, Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York/New Jersey are included here. Information on ownership and commodities is also included.

Source: US Army Corps of Engineers, The Nature Conservancy, Rutgers University

Notes:

Port Commodity (Points) / Port Facilities (Points)

See Port Facilities (Points) description.

Source: US Army Corps of Engineers, The Nature Conservancy, Rutgers University

Notes:

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Port Ownership (Points) / Port Facilities (Points)

See Port Facilities (Points) description.

Source: US Army Corps of Engineers, The Nature Conservancy, Rutgers University

Notes:

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USCG Proposed Changes to Aids to Navigation

This layer visualizes proposed changes to Aids to Navigation in the U.S. Coast Guard Fifth District. These proposals are published in the Local Notice to Mariners, available for viewing at http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/?pageName=lnmDistrict®ion=5 Interested Mariners are strongly encouraged to comment on the potential impacts that discontinuing these aids listed below would have on navigational safety to the U. S. Coast Guard Fifth District. You may provide feedback using the U. S. Coast Guard Fifth District Waterway Data Sheet. All comments will be carefully considered and are requested prior to 21 April 2015. Refer to project numbers provided in your submission. Comments may be sent to COMMANDER, FIFTH COAST GUARD DISTRICT (dpw) 431 Crawford Street, Portsmouth, Virginia 23704 Email: CGD5Waterways@uscg.mil

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VTR-MbtTiles Test

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Anchorage Areas

The areas described in subpart A (33 U.S.C. 100) are designated as special anchorage areas. Vessels of less than 20 meters are not required to exhibit anchor lights or shapes required by rule 30 of the Inland Navigation Rules (33 U.S.C. 2030). The areas described in subpart B are designated as anchorage grounds. Please Note: Some areas depicted are deemed "Anchorage Prohibited" or "Anchor at Your Own Risk." Please refer to the appropriate Nautical Chart or the CFR for more detailed information.

Source: USCG via the Code of Federal Regulations; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

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Federal OCS Sand and Gravel Borrow (Lease Areas)

Federal outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Sand and Gravel Borrow Areas (Lease Areas) are polygons which are maintained by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), part of the U.S. Department of the Interior. The polygons define areas where entities that have entered into a Negotiated Non-Competitive Lease or Memorandum of Agreement with BOEM can dredge sand, gravel or shell resources from the OCS. Section 8 (k) of the OCS Lands Act (OCSLA), as amended by Public Law 103-426 (enacted in 1994), provides BOEM the authority to negotiate an agreement for the use of OCS sand, gravel, and shell resources for use in: (1) a project for shore protection, beach restoration, or coastal restoration under taken by a Federal, State, or local government agency; or (2) for use in a construction project funded in whole or in part by, or authorized by, the Federal government. This dataset is a collection of previous and current authorized lease areas under BOEM's purview. The intent is to update the dataset when leases are added or renewed. Attribution consists of state, sand volume, and dates and identification properties associated with the lease. Revisions to the data, which would most often be to attribution, will occur regularly.

Source: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

Notes:

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Pilot Boarding Areas

Pilot boarding areas are locations at sea where pilots familiar with local waters board incoming vessels to navigate their passage to a destination port. Pilotage is compulsory for foreign vessels and U.S. vessels under register in foreign trade with specific draft characteristics.

Source: United States Coast Pilot, Northeast Ocean Data Portal, NOAA Electronic Navigational Charts (ENC)

Notes:

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AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters. Vessel records are reported as a series of points during transit or dwell-times when within range of a receiving station. Individual vessel positions have been processed into tracks and then summarized at a 100 x 100 meter (10,000 m2 ) cell resolution to characterize intensity of use. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2016, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2016. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2016 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

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Other Vessel Transit Counts (2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2016 for other (or unknown) vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2016, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2016. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2016 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

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All Vessel Transit Counts (2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2016 for all vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2016, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2016. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2016 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

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Cargo Vessel Transit Counts (2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2016 for cargo vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2016, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2016. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2016 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

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Fishing Vessel Transit Counts (2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2016 for fishing vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2016, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2016. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2016 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

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Pleasure Craft-Sailing Vessel Transit Counts (2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2016 for pleasure craft-sailing vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2016, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2016. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2016 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

View related studies via ESPIS

Tanker Vessel Transit Counts (2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2016 for tanker vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2016, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2016. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2016 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

View related studies via ESPIS

Passenger Vessel Transit Counts (2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2016 for passenger vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2016, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2016. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2016 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

Tug-Tow Vessel Transit Counts (2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2016 for tug-tow vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2016, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2016. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2016 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

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All Vessel Transit Counts (Jan 2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

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All Vessel Transit Counts (Feb 2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

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All Vessel Transit Counts (Mar 2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

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All Vessel Transit Counts (Apr 2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

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All Vessel Transit Counts (May 2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

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All Vessel Transit Counts (Jun 2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

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All Vessel Transit Counts (Jul 2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

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All Vessel Transit Counts (Aug 2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

Source:

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All Vessel Transit Counts (Sep 2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

Source:

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All Vessel Transit Counts (Oct 2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

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All Vessel Transit Counts (Nov 2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

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All Vessel Transit Counts (Dec 2016) / AIS Monthly Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

Source:

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Wrecks and Obstructions

In 1981, NOAA’s National Ocean Service (NOS) implemented the Automated Wreck and Obstruction Information System (AWOIS) to assist in planning hydrographic survey operations and to catalog and store a substantial volume of reported wrecks and obstructions that are considered navigational hazards within U.S. coastal waters. As part of the hydrographic survey planning process, these records are reviewed and those records which require additional field investigation are assigned to specific field units for verification. The results of these investigations eventually become part of the AWOIS record so that a permanent history of a wreck or obstruction is always available.

Source: NOAA Office of Coast Survey; services by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

AWOIS is not a comprehensive record of wrecks in any particular area. There are wrecks in AWOIS that do not appear on the nautical chart and there are wrecks on the nautical chart that do not appear in AWOIS. Updates to AWOIS are ongoing; however, it will never completely address every known or reported wreck. The emphasis is constantly placed on wrecks and obstructions which may be a hazard to navigation. NOAA assumes no liability for use of this data. For more information regarding these data and the definitions of the symbols please reference the following publication link: http://nauticalcharts.noaa.gov/data/docs/wrecks-and-obstructions/awois-users-guide-2013.pdf

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Shipwreck Density (DRAFT/TEST)

Source:

Notes:

AIS Vessel Density (2011)

This data set is derived from archived 2011 Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, and the Density grid depicts the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters. The data set is intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

Automatic Identification System (AIS) data are collected by the U.S. Coast Guard using automated two-way radio transmissions to track real-time vessel information such as ship identity, purpose, course, and speed, primarily in coastal U.S. waters. These data layers are derived from archived 2011 AIS data and are intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns. The density grids shown here depict the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters, though it should be noted that certain vessel types (i.e., fishing, military) are underrepresented. A track line was generated for each unique vessel from a “raw” AIS point database and these track lines were then used to create density grids.

This is a simplified view of a very complex and detailed data set. Hundreds of millions of individual points were processed and condensed into generalized density grids. These grids show a good overview of the density of most commercial shipping traffic but do not necessarily represent all shipping traffic at a fine level of detail.

Passenger Vessels (2011) / AIS Vessel Density (2011)

This data set is derived from archived 2011 Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, and the Density grid depicts the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters. The data set is intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

Automatic Identification System (AIS) data are collected by the U.S. Coast Guard using automated two-way radio transmissions to track real-time vessel information such as ship identity, purpose, course, and speed, primarily in coastal U.S. waters. These data layers are derived from archived 2011 AIS data and are intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns. The density grids shown here depict the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters, though it should be noted that certain vessel types (i.e., fishing, military) are underrepresented. A track line was generated for each unique vessel from a “raw” AIS point database and these track lines were then used to create density grids.

View related studies via ESPIS

Cargo Vessels (2011) / AIS Vessel Density (2011)

This data set is derived from archived 2011 Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, and the Density grid depicts the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters. The data set is intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

Automatic Identification System (AIS) data are collected by the U.S. Coast Guard using automated two-way radio transmissions to track real-time vessel information such as ship identity, purpose, course, and speed, primarily in coastal U.S. waters. These data layers are derived from archived 2011 AIS data and are intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns. The density grids shown here depict the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters, though it should be noted that certain vessel types (i.e., fishing, military) are underrepresented. A track line was generated for each unique vessel from a “raw” AIS point database and these track lines were then used to create density grids.

View related studies via ESPIS

All Vessels (2011) / AIS Vessel Density (2011)

This data set is derived from archived 2011 Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, and the Density grid depicts the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters. The data set is intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

Automatic Identification System (AIS) data are collected by the U.S. Coast Guard using automated two-way radio transmissions to track real-time vessel information such as ship identity, purpose, course, and speed, primarily in coastal U.S. waters. These data layers are derived from archived 2011 AIS data and are intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns. The density grids shown here depict the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters, though it should be noted that certain vessel types (i.e., fishing, military) are underrepresented. A track line was generated for each unique vessel from a “raw” AIS point database and these track lines were then used to create density grids.

View related studies via ESPIS

Tanker Vessels (2011) / AIS Vessel Density (2011)

This data set is derived from archived 2011 Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, and the Density grid depicts the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters. The data set is intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

Automatic Identification System (AIS) data are collected by the U.S. Coast Guard using automated two-way radio transmissions to track real-time vessel information such as ship identity, purpose, course, and speed, primarily in coastal U.S. waters. These data layers are derived from archived 2011 AIS data and are intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns. The density grids shown here depict the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters, though it should be noted that certain vessel types (i.e., fishing, military) are underrepresented. A track line was generated for each unique vessel from a “raw” AIS point database and these track lines were then used to create density grids.

View related studies via ESPIS

Tug-Tow Vessels (2011) / AIS Vessel Density (2011)

This data set is derived from archived 2011 Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, and the Density grid depicts the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters. The data set is intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

Automatic Identification System (AIS) data are collected by the U.S. Coast Guard using automated two-way radio transmissions to track real-time vessel information such as ship identity, purpose, course, and speed, primarily in coastal U.S. waters. These data layers are derived from archived 2011 AIS data and are intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns. The density grids shown here depict the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters, though it should be noted that certain vessel types (i.e., fishing, military) are underrepresented. A track line was generated for each unique vessel from a “raw” AIS point database and these track lines were then used to create density grids.

View related studies via ESPIS

AIS Vessel Density (2012)

This data set is derived from archived 2012 Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, and the Density grid depicts the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters. The data set is intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

Automatic Identification System (AIS) data are collected by the U.S. Coast Guard using automated two-way radio transmissions to track real-time vessel information such as ship identity, purpose, course, and speed, primarily in coastal U.S. waters. These data layers are derived from archived 2012 AIS data and are intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns. The density grids shown here depict the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters, though it should be noted that certain vessel types (i.e., fishing, military) are underrepresented. A track line was generated for each unique vessel from a “raw” AIS point database and these track lines were then used to create density grids. This is a simplified view of a very complex and detailed data set. Hundreds of millions of individual points were processed and condensed into generalized density grids. These grids show a good overview of the density of most commercial shipping traffic but do not necessarily represent all shipping traffic at a fine level of detail.

View related studies via ESPIS

All Vessels (2012) / AIS Vessel Density (2012)

This data set is derived from archived 2012 Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, and the Density grid depicts the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters. The data set is intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

Automatic Identification System (AIS) data are collected by the U.S. Coast Guard using automated two-way radio transmissions to track real-time vessel information such as ship identity, purpose, course, and speed, primarily in coastal U.S. waters. These data layers are derived from archived 2012 AIS data and are intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns. The density grids shown here depict the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters, though it should be noted that certain vessel types (i.e., fishing, military) are underrepresented. A track line was generated for each unique vessel from a “raw” AIS point database and these track lines were then used to create density grids.

View related studies via ESPIS

Passenger Vessels (2012) / AIS Vessel Density (2012)

This data set is derived from archived 2012 Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, and the Density grid depicts the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters. The data set is intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

Automatic Identification System (AIS) data are collected by the U.S. Coast Guard using automated two-way radio transmissions to track real-time vessel information such as ship identity, purpose, course, and speed, primarily in coastal U.S. waters. These data layers are derived from archived 2012 AIS data and are intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns. The density grids shown here depict the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters, though it should be noted that certain vessel types (i.e., fishing, military) are underrepresented. A track line was generated for each unique vessel from a “raw” AIS point database and these track lines were then used to create density grids.

View related studies via ESPIS

Cargo Vessels (2012) / AIS Vessel Density (2012)

This data set is derived from archived 2012 Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, and the Density grid depicts the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters. The data set is intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

Automatic Identification System (AIS) data are collected by the U.S. Coast Guard using automated two-way radio transmissions to track real-time vessel information such as ship identity, purpose, course, and speed, primarily in coastal U.S. waters. These data layers are derived from archived 2012 AIS data and are intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns. The density grids shown here depict the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters, though it should be noted that certain vessel types (i.e., fishing, military) are underrepresented. A track line was generated for each unique vessel from a “raw” AIS point database and these track lines were then used to create density grids.

View related studies via ESPIS

Tanker Vessels (2012) / AIS Vessel Density (2012)

This data set is derived from archived 2012 Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, and the Density grid depicts the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters. The data set is intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

Automatic Identification System (AIS) data are collected by the U.S. Coast Guard using automated two-way radio transmissions to track real-time vessel information such as ship identity, purpose, course, and speed, primarily in coastal U.S. waters. These data layers are derived from archived 2012 AIS data and are intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns. The density grids shown here depict the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters, though it should be noted that certain vessel types (i.e., fishing, military) are underrepresented. A track line was generated for each unique vessel from a “raw” AIS point database and these track lines were then used to create density grids.

View related studies via ESPIS

Tug-Tow Vessels (2012) / AIS Vessel Density (2012)

This data set is derived from archived 2012 Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, and the Density grid depicts the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters. The data set is intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

Automatic Identification System (AIS) data are collected by the U.S. Coast Guard using automated two-way radio transmissions to track real-time vessel information such as ship identity, purpose, course, and speed, primarily in coastal U.S. waters. These data layers are derived from archived 2012 AIS data and are intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns. The density grids shown here depict the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters, though it should be noted that certain vessel types (i.e., fishing, military) are underrepresented. A track line was generated for each unique vessel from a “raw” AIS point database and these track lines were then used to create density grids.

View related studies via ESPIS

AIS Vessel Density (2013)

This data set is derived from archived 2013 Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, and the Density grid depicts the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters. The data set is intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

Automatic Identification System (AIS) data are collected by the U.S. Coast Guard using automated two-way radio transmissions to track real-time vessel information such as ship identity, purpose, course, and speed, primarily in coastal U.S. waters. These data layers are derived from archived 2013 AIS data and are intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns. The density grids shown here depict the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters, though it should be noted that certain vessel types (i.e., fishing, military) are underrepresented. A track line was generated for each unique vessel from a “raw” AIS point database and these track lines were then used to create density grids. This is a simplified view of a very complex and detailed data set. Hundreds of millions of individual points were processed and condensed into generalized density grids. These grids show a good overview of the density of most commercial shipping traffic but do not necessarily represent all shipping traffic at a fine level of detail.

View related studies via ESPIS

Tug-Tow Vessels (2013) / AIS Vessel Density (2013)

This data set is derived from archived 2013 Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, and the Density grid depicts the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters. The data set is intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

Automatic Identification System (AIS) data are collected by the U.S. Coast Guard using automated two-way radio transmissions to track real-time vessel information such as ship identity, purpose, course, and speed, primarily in coastal U.S. waters. These data layers are derived from archived 2013 AIS data and are intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns. The density grids shown here depict the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters, though it should be noted that certain vessel types (i.e., fishing, military) are underrepresented. A track line was generated for each unique vessel from a “raw” AIS point database and these track lines were then used to create density grids.

View related studies via ESPIS

All Vessels (2013) / AIS Vessel Density (2013)

This data set is derived from archived 2013 Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, and the Density grid depicts the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters. The data set is intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

Automatic Identification System (AIS) data are collected by the U.S. Coast Guard using automated two-way radio transmissions to track real-time vessel information such as ship identity, purpose, course, and speed, primarily in coastal U.S. waters. These data layers are derived from archived 2013 AIS data and are intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns. The density grids shown here depict the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters, though it should be noted that certain vessel types (i.e., fishing, military) are underrepresented. A track line was generated for each unique vessel from a “raw” AIS point database and these track lines were then used to create density grids.

View related studies via ESPIS

Cargo Vessels (2013) / AIS Vessel Density (2013)

See AIS Shipping Data (2013) description.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

View related studies via ESPIS

Passenger Vessels (2013) / AIS Vessel Density (2013)

This data set is derived from archived 2013 Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, and the Density grid depicts the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters. The data set is intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

Automatic Identification System (AIS) data are collected by the U.S. Coast Guard using automated two-way radio transmissions to track real-time vessel information such as ship identity, purpose, course, and speed, primarily in coastal U.S. waters. These data layers are derived from archived 2013 AIS data and are intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns. The density grids shown here depict the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters, though it should be noted that certain vessel types (i.e., fishing, military) are underrepresented. A track line was generated for each unique vessel from a “raw” AIS point database and these track lines were then used to create density grids.

View related studies via ESPIS

Tanker Vessels (2013) / AIS Vessel Density (2013)

This data set is derived from archived 2013 Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, and the Density grid depicts the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters. The data set is intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns.

Source: U.S. Coast Guard; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

Automatic Identification System (AIS) data are collected by the U.S. Coast Guard using automated two-way radio transmissions to track real-time vessel information such as ship identity, purpose, course, and speed, primarily in coastal U.S. waters. These data layers are derived from archived 2013 AIS data and are intended to be used by the ocean planning community to better understand vessel traffic patterns. The density grids shown here depict the concentration of a majority of commercial shipping traffic within U.S. coastal and offshore waters, though it should be noted that certain vessel types (i.e., fishing, military) are underrepresented. A track line was generated for each unique vessel from a “raw” AIS point database and these track lines were then used to create density grids.

View related studies via ESPIS

AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2013)

Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters. Vessel records are reported as a series of points during transit or dwell-times when within range of a receiving station. Individual vessel positions have been processed into tracks and then summarized at a 100 x 100 meter (10,000 m2 ) cell resolution to characterize intensity of use. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Data source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2013, Marine Cadastre, 2015; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northe

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2013. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2013 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

View related studies via ESPIS

All Vessel Transit Counts (2013) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2013)

Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters. Vessel records are reported as a series of points during transit or dwell-times when within range of a receiving station. Individual vessel positions have been processed into tracks and then summarized at a 100 x 100 meter (10,000 m2 ) cell resolution to characterize intensity of use. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2013, Marine Cadastre, 2015; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2013. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2013 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

View related studies via ESPIS

Tug-Tow Vessel Transit Counts (2013) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2013)

Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters. Vessel records are reported as a series of points during transit or dwell-times when within range of a receiving station. Individual vessel positions have been processed into tracks and then summarized at a 100 x 100 meter (10,000 m2 ) cell resolution to characterize intensity of use. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2013, Marine Cadastre, 2015; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2013. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2013 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

View related studies via ESPIS

Cargo Vessel Transit Counts (2013) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2013)

Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters. Vessel records are reported as a series of points during transit or dwell-times when within range of a receiving station. Individual vessel positions have been processed into tracks and then summarized at a 100 x 100 meter (10,000 m2 ) cell resolution to characterize intensity of use. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2013, Marine Cadastre, 2015; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2013. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2013 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

View related studies via ESPIS

Passenger Vessel Transit Counts (2013) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2013)

Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters. Vessel records are reported as a series of points during transit or dwell-times when within range of a receiving station. Individual vessel positions have been processed into tracks and then summarized at a 100 x 100 meter (10,000 m2 ) cell resolution to characterize intensity of use. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2013, Marine Cadastre, 2015; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2013. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2013 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

View related studies via ESPIS

Tanker Vessel Transit Counts (2013) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2013)

Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters. Vessel records are reported as a series of points during transit or dwell-times when within range of a receiving station. Individual vessel positions have been processed into tracks and then summarized at a 100 x 100 meter (10,000 m2 ) cell resolution to characterize intensity of use. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2013, Marine Cadastre, 2015; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2013. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2013 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

View related studies via ESPIS

AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2015)

Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters. Vessel records are reported as a series of points during transit or dwell-times when within range of a receiving station. Individual vessel positions have been processed into tracks and then summarized at a 100 x 100 meter (10,000 m2 ) cell resolution to characterize intensity of use. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2015, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2015. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2015 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

View related studies via ESPIS

Passenger Vessel Transit Counts (2015) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2015)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2015 for passenger vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2015, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2015. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2015 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

View related studies via ESPIS

Other Vessel Transit Counts (2015) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2015)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2015 for other (or unknown) vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2015, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2015. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2015 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

View related studies via ESPIS

Pleasure Craft-Sailing Vessel Transit Counts (2015) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2015)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2015 for pleasure craft-sailing vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2015, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2015. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2015 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

View related studies via ESPIS

Tanker Vessel Transit Counts (2015) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2015)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2015 for tanker vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2015, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2015. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2015 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

View related studies via ESPIS

Cargo Vessel Transit Counts (2015) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2015)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2015 for cargo vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2015, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2015. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2015 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

View related studies via ESPIS

Tug-Tow Vessel Transit Counts (2015) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2015)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2015 for tug-tow vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2015, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2015. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2015 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

View related studies via ESPIS

All Vessel Transit Counts (2015) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2015)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2015 for all vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2015, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2015. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2015 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

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Fishing Vessel Transit Counts (2015) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2015)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2015 for fishing vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2015, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2015. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2015 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

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AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2016)

Source:

Notes:

AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2017)

Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters. Vessel records are reported as a series of points during transit or dwell-times when within range of a receiving station. Individual vessel positions have been processed into tracks and then summarized at a 100 x 100 meter (10,000 m2 ) cell resolution to characterize intensity of use. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2017, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2017. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2017 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

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Tug-Tow Vessel Transit Counts (2017) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2017)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2017 for tug-tow vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2017, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2017. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2017 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

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All Vessel Transit Counts (2017) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2017)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2017 for all vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2017, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2017. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2017 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

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Cargo Vessel Transit Counts (2017 / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2017)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2017 for cargo vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2017, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2017. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2017 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

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Fishing Vessel Transit Counts (2017) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2017)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2017 for fishing vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2017, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2017. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2017 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

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Other Vessel Transit Counts (2017) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2017)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2017 for other (or unknown) vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2017, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2017. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2017 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

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Passenger Vessel Transit Counts (2017) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2017)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2017 for passenger vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2017, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2017. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2017 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

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Pleasure Craft-Sailing Vessel Transit Counts (2017) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2017)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2017 for pleasure craft-sailing vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2017, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2017. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2017 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

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Tanker Vessel Transit Counts (2017) / AIS Vessel Transit Counts (2017)

This layer shows the vessel transit counts in 2017 for tanker vessels that carry Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders. AIS are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and international waters in real-time. The data represent vessel transit counts in 100 meter grid cells. A single transit is counted each time a vessel track passes through, starts, or stops within each grid cell.

Source: Atlantic vessel tracks 2017, Marine Cadastre, 2018; MarineCadastre.gov; Nationwide Automatic Identification System, U.S. Coast Guard; Northeast Regional Ocean Planning White Paper Update: Overview of the Maritime Commerce Sector in the Northeastern U.S.

Notes:

Logical Consistency: No testing was performed on the source trackline data. Data were visually inspected to confirm that the results of the density analysis were reasonable. Completeness: Data are complete based on all known U.S. Coast Guard Nationwide Automatic Identification System records from 2017. Source data were created using the Marine Cadastre TrackBuilder Tool with filter settings of 30 minutes and 1 mile. The gridded raster identifies vessel transit counts based on the results of that analysis. Positional Accuracy: Horizontal accuracy is dependent on the location of the transmitted AIS locations from GPS and includes errors associated with this technology. Timeliness: 2017 Use restrictions: NOT FOR NAVIGATION. Distribution Liability: Data are provided as is. NROC and RPS Group Inc. are not liable for any interpretations, assumptions, or conclusions based on these data.

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NASCA Submarine Cables

This data shows the locations of in service and out of service submarine cables that that are owned by members of NASCA and that are in U.S territorial waters. The maximum scale range for viewing the cables is 36,112. Cables within 100 meters of landfall were removed from the data set. Other cables may exist in U.S. waters that are owned by non-NASCA members. Additional information can be found at http://www.n-a-s-c-a.org/; those requiring more detailed submarine telecom cable charting information are requested to submit any requests for information to CableCharts@n-a-s-c-a.org. Please also view the Maintenance Authority Contact List found under more information. Contact information for the various cables can be found here.

Source: North American Submarine Cable Association (NASCA); Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

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Ocean Disposal Sites

This map layer shows approved ocean disposal sites. It indicates the areas within which dumping of wastes is permitted under conditions specified in permits issued under sections 102 and 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act, also known as the Ocean Dumping Act. Such sites are identified by boundaries established by coordinates of latitude and longitude for each corner, or by coordinates of latitude and longitude for the center point and a radius in nautical miles from that point. Boundary coordinates shall be identified as precisely as is warranted by the accuracy with which the site can be located with existing navigational aids or by the implantation of transponders, buoys or other means of marking the site.

This layer is currently only showing data from areas off of North Carolina north through Maine on the East Coast. This data layer will be expanded and updated over time to include national coverage. It was created referencing the U.S Code of Federal Regulations Title 40: Protection of Environment, Part 228 and best available data from the US Army Corps of Engineers.

Source: US Government Publishing Office, NOAA Office of Coast Survey, US Army Corps of Engineers; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

Notes:

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Maintained Channels

Maintained channels are areas designated as navigable channels, maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers. In the MARCO Portal, these data are displayed in three depth classes: 0-35', 35-45', and >45'. These data were derived from NOAA Electronic Navigation Charts (ENC) and translated and stored in a geodatabase by NOAA Coastal Services Center for the purposes of regional ocean planning.

Source: NOAA ENCs

Notes:

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